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Religion - Germany vs USA



welcome to Germany vs. USA today we want to talk about religion so today Alex and I wanted to talk to you all about religion first of all you're not we're not experts so religion is always a very very tough topic so if we say something wrong if we offend anybody we're trying to promote event you know anybody but if we say something wrong please excuse us um and if you you know again please correct us – it's all so um yeah so according I'll leave a comment correct us but your two cents in and at least I'll you know leave out the whatever kind of extreme comments somebody's gonna put down there please don't do that we asked when we know you will we're gonna be up but let's get into it um I think one thing one thing about America to me is the freedom of religion now I know you all have freedom of religion but we take it to the next level I think I mean there are thousands of religions right true ah very true if you go to California like in Los Angeles or San Francisco basically running around you just see all kinds of little little like chemic Turkish buildings where they have their own religion you know somebody just lately started it right Angie cozy environment right I think y'all would view it more as a cult like yeah there's insomnia in Germany this there's the tension if it's if it's also you know official religion that's usually like put into a pot of like cults Scientology it's one of those things that's that there's a big debate about Scientology in Germany and I think there's something in cork going on right now whether it is a religion or religious group or if it's a cult I would say the public opinion about Scientology is party it's seen as a cult northerner where hmm yeah no comment no no we don't know we don't know we're just saying but I mean I can give personal examples I mean I grew up in Mississippi so you know that's the Bible Belt if you're unfamiliar with that that's like the southeast part of the United States seeing us that I kind of like strict conservative riah country and I grew up Methodist which is what a Protestant and in the process there's Methodist Baptist Lutheran press for Tyrion a Episcopalian you know at least this is what I think I could could be wrong you know yeah that's what I think that's why it's so like there are many like the Protestants the biggest the biggest religious group in the u.s. is actually progressing right only percent yeah about 50% of you know the religious people in the US are Protestant about twenty four twenty five percent and a Catholic uh-huh and then from there so it's a huge drop-off you know think like the Jewish populations like around 2% which I was shocked I don't this maybe someone could help me with that number I thought there would be more good and you know moments that are they Saints yeah that's about 2% as well pretty to Salt Lake City here and then in Germany there are basically there are two major groups the the Protestant and the Catholic Roman Catholic and then both of them are about around 30 percent of the richest people in Germany alone to the to these groups and and but it's the the Protestant problems for the Lutheran actually is usually like it's a less strict religion the Catholic are usually more conservative stricter the em again that's more I think that's the general public opinion I think and then there's a huge drop and then I think the Muslim is around 5% and then there's again a huge drop and then it goes to 0.7% when I think of Catholics in Germany I think of like Munich and very like this the southern part is said to be a little bit more Catholic and there are some like at least that's in my brain and like in like in Bavaria there are some like like small villages they're basically completely Catholic and it's um yes has its unique little flavor yeah as a unique feel to it yeah like I for me is like a little village and like mountain somewhere it kind of like slightly isolated and for Catholic and you know they know everything everything everybody knows what's going on it's good kind of kind of funny tell me about this church tax oh yeah dg2 story oh yeah that's remember that's that's really weird to Americans if you're part of them I can also show you what the Catholics are the Protestants if you're part of the Catholic or Protestant religion and Germany um you have to pay a church tax and that is I don't know how many percent of your salary but it's normal percent basis and if you remember of the church you get to pay the tax I think and if you don't pay you're not a member right but you're able to pay and don't pay you're not a member yeah I'm not a hundred percent sure of that but I think if you want to be remember of the church and you're able to pay it you can afford it then you know you're supposed to pay and if you just refuse to them I don't know what's gonna happen yeah we do I mean we do you know donations which we have on Plus on that like traditional right and it's a you know call like your commitment and I think is what the little pamphlet actually says but it's not it's not required but like I think why do I say that is we do this to like support our church like to help the church as y'all but I think the churches in Germany I get government money too whereas they don't get government money in America actually that I think the different religious groups in the u.s. are strictly um well oh yeah with like laws and like and like taxes dependents like strictly separated from religious and snake which is in Germany slightly differ because this you can tell it's a tax you know like right but I think you can say that their religion in the the German life plays like or especially the German like politics in the German media place like less of a role than it does in the USA I if we yeah I can have the feeling that leg in the US that the religion plays a huge role of like influential stuff like but you know you usually you know influential people always product or certain religion and they well they don't promote that but you know they were open about right like well we were in DC Obama was touring DC looking for his church uh-huh you know and and that was on the news like Obama's Church hunting like what church did you go yeah like which starts is he going to pick you to take his family to so yeah it's more involved right and the in Germany that's just not you know like an open topic to talk about you might you know like you know that you know I think was Merkel when she swore or finished when she was sworn in I think she did the whole oh she put her hand on the from the Bible and you can choose to do that but that's usually you know it's not that big of a deal in Germany like nobody's made it to if you don't do it or even I mean the church goes pretty deep just to like censorship and I like with as well say with media yeah with the media it's you know the last thing we've touched on it before we you can't say certain words so certain things right and I think that's also because of like a religious background uh-huh towards there yeah I can see that yeah I can definitely see them let's talk about school because I had um religion classes in school in my elementary I went to you know I always every year had religion classes and I went to like um to a Catholic gymnasium like monastery nauseam and you know we prayed every morning and you like a mess probably every other week or once a month or something and it's very very common in German schools to have religion classes and you saw all sort of a finish and in many cases in my case I might school I had to take them and many other schools is the same thing you have to take relaxation I mean there are all ways to get out but usually you know it's just like by default you have religion classes the school language I know there are Christian schools in the US where you have to take you know religion classes and everything must go on to was a private dis Academy and we were not forced to take any religion classes yeah don't hear enough for us but again my bloody poles right you know go do it right it was you know it was elective if we wanted to do it but we would pray every morning every morning even though you were there they're really just school alright as interesting um and then even you know before school like like we'd have FCA like a Fellowship of Christian Athletes and we would meet and pray or have a lesson and we'd always have you know religious speakers come talk to us so it was very heavily Christian influence school okay but we weren't a Christian school religion it's a tough topic and I'm sure we didn't touch on everything because religion is so much a person you know there's so many things of life so help us out leave some comments you know add value in your comments yeah definitely um yeah religion that was it I'll take it easy you you

Otis Rodgers

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48 COMMENTS

  1. Elisa Mastromarino Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Only 5 percent Muslim? See ya! Going to Germany.

    Reply
  2. N. Ludemann Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Hi from Germany! Concerning "Church Tax": It is about 9% of the Income Tax and the churches may – if they want – raise a Church Contribution. But if they do, it is just a small amount. The system is very special and comes from the Napoleonic Wars and the end of the First German Empire. France had occupied many territories in Germany – and there have been Church-Territories in Germany where the Bishop or some other clergy-person actually was the ruler. The secular princes (Kings, Dukes, Counts) who had lost territories to the French got a compensation – the church-territories. The deal was that the princes from then on payed the clergy as a compensation for their loss. This was called the "Reichsdeputationshauptschluss " – long and complicated compositum – we love this ūüėČ The system of Kirchensteuer started in the territory of Lippe-Detmold in 1827, 24 years after the Reichsdeputationshauptschluss (again! I love this one!). Not going into historical detail, today the state collects the incometax and if you are a member of the Roman Catholic, the Old Catholic Church, one of the protestant "Landeskirchen" or the Jewish Community, they collect an additional 0,9% or something of your incometax. This is transferred to the Diocese, Landeskirche or whatever community of public law (K√∂rperschaft √∂ffentlichen Rechts) and from there internally transferred to the congregation one belongs to. The clergy of those churches/communities are payed like civil servants ("Kirchenbeamte"). Every churchlike "K√∂rperschaft √∂ffentlichen Rechts" CAN opt to take part in this system, so even smaller churches could if they wanted, but most do not do this (like the Baptists, Methodists etc) Today even the Jehovas Witnesses have "K√∂rperschaftsrechte"… I hope my little sermon was helpful to get a first idea…

    Reply
  3. ElusiaBoomkin Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    it sounds, like happens often in the south, that your public school was breaking federal law, namely the constitution and the supreme courts rulings on the seperation of church and state. your school can't organize anything religious such as prayers or having religious speakers come to your school and preach. the only way it's legal is when it's entirely started and organized by the students and school resources arent used…which is NEVER the case and only used as an excuse by the adult cult members that don't want to follow the laws of our country because they think their cult's rules supersede the constitution. basically i'm saying the south is full of christians practicing their own form of sharia law.

    Reply
  4. Mark Anders Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Since you are dealing with topics that you have no clue about. Why not tackle quantum physics next episode?

    Reply
  5. Devin Petersen Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Germany was Lutheran for the longest time now morality doesn't exist in germany anymore now after the fall of Nazi germany

    Reply
  6. foo bar Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    was soll denn die arschkriecherei vor religi√∂sen gef√ľhlen? vor osterhasengl√§ubigen wird sich doch auch nicht so angeschissen. fuck religion, all idiots

    Reply
  7. helmutnyc Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    I am a liberal secular Christian lol from New York City

    Reply
  8. Bernard Goldstein Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    What happened to these guys?

    Reply
  9. Eddie Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Im from the bible belt as well and culture is most certainly heavily influenced by Christianity. But at the same time, as per seperation of Church and state Public Schools do not do anything religous, only private schools. This also goes into the taxes you guys were talking about, Pastors of independant churches regularly make six figures because they pay nothing to the state and the state pays nothing to them. Churches with hierarchies usually split up money though so they dont get rich like some lol. And as far as Germany goes they practically invented Protestantism with Luther!

    Reply
  10. Roger Lynch Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    A SECT or CULT, even if it is a Protestant one. The point is Church is still defind by the REICHSKONKORDAT from the end of the 19th century based on the AUGSBURGER REICHS UND RELIGIONSFRIEDEN from the 31st October 1555. Here had been stated which Protestant groups like the Lutherans, the M√ľnzer and the German Calvinists became officially equal to the Catholic Church. Hence German Protestants celebrate this day Germany wide as a hollyday, REICHSREFORMATIONSTAG. Back in school in West Berlin I had always free back then. Also all members of exepted Churchgroups have to pay CHURCH TAX in Germany. All other groups do it as some kind of a voluntary club fee.

    Reply
  11. Chris clark Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    why should anyone support a church??? does anyone believe really in that shit??

    Reply
  12. Chris clark Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    religions suck. the german mythology is very interesting, but if you think of it, there can't be a odin, thor, freya, frey, loki etc

    Reply
  13. Chris clark Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    both are christians bastards!! they eat their own god, how stupid???
    how can you just have one god? the gods will be very angry with you all

    Reply
  14. zerzer Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Now, muslims are over 50%

    Reply
  15. EVG 1 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    majority of public schools in America would never allow prayer or any religious studies, that would focus on Christianity. Prayer was banned in 1954 due to 1 atheist thriwing a fit and going to court. America pretty much went down hill from there, and thats why we have so many problems here today in society, politics and entertainment (as well as laws)

    Reply
  16. Subuzgreatest Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    6:20 to 6:28 .

    I loved how the German guy was very subtle about it..

    Don't be afraid my German brother. I agree with you and support you because I see it too.

    Reply
  17. Till Eulenspiegel Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Especially in Eastern Germany you have more philosophy and nowadays a majority of atheists.

    Reply
  18. Mormy the Outcast Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    3:09 wooohoooo Mormon

    Reply
  19. ManonVarendaz Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    In Germany especially after primary school religion becomes more of an ethics and philosophy class and doesn't just look at Christianity as a religion.

    Reply
  20. Hannah Hutagalung Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    It's pretty sad that the Germans who were once the fathers of Christianity, from the maestro composers like Bach, Handel, etc, to the Reformation day back in 1517 in Wittenberg, are fading away. Like, okay, the buildings still exist but it just turns out as an architectural history site and background set for music videos, movies etc. I mean, well, as a Protestant, I just feel awkward seeing that the place where our supplemental fundaments of doctrine came from has been slowly secularised, and most of the people there see churches as a burden for tax and "just an organisation of generous people who support kids and old and the many". I don't know, is it just me (question for other Protestants out there)?

    Reply
  21. John Callaghan Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    In Europe we're raised catholics, but we are atheists. And then you have the muslims. The only difference you still can see here, in Europe is : Western Europe is basically atheist, Poland, Spain, Italy and Czech and Slowakian republics are catholics. And you can also feel the difference between former catholic countries and former protestant countries. Like : Holland is much more liberal, because of its protestant past, but still as atheist as the rest of western Europe. The muslims now gradually take over through the previously 'governmentally organised' system, but this is only in its infancy. The church doesn't have any christian customers anymore, so they gradually turn to where there still are customers.

    Reply
  22. Ishtiaqe Hanif Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Clicked on Pizza… Came up Religion…

    Reply
  23. 11pakegmail.com Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    sick shit…..

    Reply
  24. Talpa 1987 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    I don't like the Church tax, but churches provide us with Kindergarten, schools, old peoples' homes and hospitals and that is, why for me it is okay to pay it. It would make more sense to give the money to the state to finance those things, but well.

    Reply
  25. Yukimiko0001 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    you have to pay it because it is directly taken from your payment before you even get your payment

    Reply
  26. Julien Lombardi Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Other groups in the US: reformed, quite influential, especially with baptists, presbyterians (I read they're the ones who fashioned the USA), episcopalians, JWs not insignificant, eastern religions, and weird things like wicca, neopagan, new age and all the flag worshippers…

    Reply
  27. Thea Poppet Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Germans came from Scandinavia, which supports ancient Pagan beliefs. Specifically Norse Paganism/Asatru.

    Reply
  28. packersfan117 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    The population of those who don't claim a religion in America is on the rise. I grew up in a religious household, but now, as a 27 year old, I claim none. If you're religious, that's cool, do your own thing. If you're not religious, that's cool too. Do your own thing. When people of faith (or no faith) try to shove their beliefs down someone else's throat…come on man, not cool.

    Reply
  29. Is Mise Barney Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    jews make up 2% of America's population. 50 of the forbes top 100 richest people in america are jewish. 95% of America's wealth is owned by the richest top 1% of the population. It has to be said that in order to be financially successful sometimes it's not what you know it's who you know… and as for the israeli butality of palestinian people. I guess the American government would rather listen to their rich friends than speak out and tell the truth..

    Reply
  30. joern1970 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    The church tax in Germany is historically based on a contract between the church and the state more than 200 years ago. The church did give most of their lands to the state. I think the state that made this deal was Prussia at that time as Germany as we know it today did not yet exist. As compensation the state promised to finance the church. The church tax is how this is executed today. The state charges this tax only to members of the church. So the state somehow does the administrative work for collecting a membership fee. If you are not a member of one of the big churches, you will not pay it. If you want to leave a church and stop paying it, it is quite simple: You go to your local city hall and declare that you leave the church. It took me a few minutes to do so many years ago. I was a member, because my parents were, but as an Atheist, I did not see a point staying a member.

    Reply
  31. Loon Atic Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Making kids pray in a public school is a shame for any country that has a constitution that demands freedom of religion and seperation of state and religion. Also the balance between the right of parents to raise their children the way they consider right and the right of their children to choice of religion/non religion is a very delicate subject. I'd tend to give the religious freedom of the children a higher value, just as we gave the right of children for a nonviolent education a higher priority.
    You will obviously give children some perspective on the world with the way you educate them but forcing their thinking into religious structures is limiting their freedom to decide for themselves for or against religion once they are old enough to recognize the implications of each perspective.
    So I'd say the ideal should be to treat religion like alcohol: let kid's decide once they are old enough to be responsible for themselves and have the cognitive capacity to grasp the implications.

    Reply
  32. Entropy Zero Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    When you don't pay the Kirchensteuer you don't get kicked out of the church, you get sued!
    There's lots of people (of both denominations) who quit church* and after ten years or so (which is the length of time the city has to keep a record of them quitting church) they get billed by their former church for years and years of retroactive taxes with compound interest. So if you don't keep the document stating that you quit church with you for the rest of your life you can be liable to pay hundrets of Euros in backtaxes!

    Also, some higher religious officials like cardinals and such get payed by our regular taxes whether we're part of their religion or not (they get a state salary).

    "Secular country" my ass :/

    *Yes, you have to actually go through legal steps to do that. Otherwise, once your parents have a priest dump some water on you as an infant, you're considered a member of that church whom they can extort this way!

    Reply
  33. nigratruo Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    It an intersting fact that the USA is the only developed western country that is still so fundamentalist and extremely religious. In Europe and the rest of the western world, religion has fallen asleep, people are well, they have job security and money, crime is down and therefore that they are not suffering badly, they don't go to church anymore.
    Now the US of course has so many fundamentalists, because all the really extreme ones that wanted to have their own religion left Europe for America after being prosecuted by the catholic church and the protestant one, and so the US got a fresh infusion of religious zeal.

    Reply
  34. Stephanie Baker Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Sorry, I meant…Won't come knocking on your door….

    Reply
  35. Stephanie Baker Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    While there is freedom of religion and such in the U.S, you can also be shunned, alienated, and ignored, and treated with outright hostility for not being part of the predominant religion in certain regions…..Utah and the deep south are shining examples…I've lived in both of the affore mentioned areas for work. I can almost wager that most religious groups in Germany or Europe for that matter….come knocking on your door on the weekend ready to bludgeon you with their bible.

    Reply
  36. Fritha71 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    I'm from a country (Finland) where only twenty years ago almost 90% of the people were Christened into Lutheran faith. Now the number has dropped to maybe 80%. The vast majority of us are not practicing Christians, but Lutheran culture still plays a big part in our traditions etc. You only ever had maybe one kid in your class, who didn't belong to the Lutheran Church, but that was it. Growing up I never knew anybody who was Catholic, let alone Jewish. I knew a couple of people, who were Eastern Orthodox (not sure if that is the correct term.) One just automatically assumed everybody was Lutheran by default.

    Had we not had religion classes, I would never have learned about or been exposed to the different religions of the world in a fairly objective manner. It was really important in such a homogeneous culture like Finland. Also, had we not been taught about the Bible, it's background and texts, in school, I would never have known anything about that either – we never even had a Bible at home and we certainly never went to church, unless somebody was getting married or there was a funeral to attend. In school we went to church a couple of times a year, just before Christmas and on Eastern.

    I'm comfortably and totally non-religious these days, but still love churches and don't mind Christian rituals and customs. I just regard it as part of my cultural background. Would love to attend church properly during Christmas, but that is the one time of the year when our churches are full of people, seems like everybody else loves the experience as well! It's just atmospheric to be singing traditional hymns and Christmas songs in a proper church that time of the year… No need to believe in any kind of higher power to enjoy that =)

    Reply
  37. Djentleman Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Lol I thought there were more Catholics than Protestants in the US, probably cause I'm from NJ, we have a lot of Catholics.

    Reply
  38. Connie Lorraaine Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    I want to thank these two wonderful friends for submitting these very entertaining videos! I have really enjoyed watching each one! I was raised in the south (N.C, Va., Ga.) with a German mother so I catch certain subjects because that is what I know too! Also, I think the more we learn from each other's cultures the better we are as a nation and citizens! Thanks again! What fun!

    Reply
  39. Chris Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Churches in America don't pay corporate taxes, residential taxes, payroll taxes….this is their free government money.

    Reply
  40. Kat A. Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    My college wasn't a Christian college or private institution at all but at the graduation ceremony they have both a Christian preacher and rabbi say a prayer to open and close. I thought that was very interesting.

    Reply
  41. Steele1925 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    501 C3….. Churches that teach federalized agendas are given money from the U.S. Government. Look it up, it's over 85% of all U.S. churches, synagogues, and mosques are just spewing government propaganda. Not just the big ones.

    Reply
  42. Theswagmuffin Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Mississippi is the dumbest fattest least developed most religious and 2nd most conservative state

    Reply
  43. Theswagmuffin Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Luckily i live in Massachusetts where not many are religious

    Reply
  44. Vanb19 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    The "church tax" in Germany is probably similar to the tithe here (10% of earning). Only here it's not automatically taken out of your pay, and you're not considered not part of your church if you don't pay it. It's up to each individual whether to give a tithe. You're encouraged to do it, but paying or not paying is considered as something between you and God.

    Also based on some of the comments, it appears that the "church tax" is something that everyone in Germany is required to pay whether they attend church or not which is not something that happens here. Nonbelievers and believers who are not members of the local church are not expected to tithe at a church to which they don't belong.

    Reply
  45. Bernie1927 Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    Why are you guys so touchy about religion? Doesn't it make sense that the State will tax people who want the church to be financially supported by tax dollars, and that it lets people opt out if they publicly state their non belief? Makes sense to me.

    Reply
  46. STRAFEANDWIN Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    6:30 so this is the biggest church or cult that paid the most bribe money.

    Reply
  47. Joseph Radd Posted on July 15, 2019 at 3:18 pm

    The one thing I don't like about USA is the fact that religion is not taught in schools. It is actually forbidden to teach religion in schools. Now I know that with the diversity of religions one could end up with ine debate after another, but in reality this causes division within the country and science is the glue.

    However, science does not hold all the answers, and there is a lack of morality due to the notion that we are not encoursged to practice righteousness in the name of God.

    Science does not teach morality.

    Reply
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